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  • Broke your arm? Exercise the other one to strengthen it

    If you have ever broken an arm and had to wear a cast or splint for a few weeks, you will be familiar with the alarming loss of muscle and uneasy feeling of weakness experienced after removing your cast. Most people do not do much exercise while a broken arm is healing and can struggle with this loss of muscle, known as "atrophy," and weakness for many weeks after the injury.


    Source: Medical Xpress

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  • Treating and Managing Shoulder Pain

    Sore shoulder remedies: This common joint problem can affect anyone. Shoulder pain may involve the cartilage, ligaments, muscles, nerves, or tendons. It can also include the shoulder blade, neck, arm, and hand.


    Source: Healthline

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  • What happens with a pinched nerve in the shoulder?

    A pinched nerve in the shoulder occurs when a nearby structure irritates or presses on a nerve coming from the neck. This can lead to shoulder pain and numbness of the arm and hand.


    Source: Medical News Today

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  • Another step toward the hand prosthesis of the future

    Researchers stimulated the nerves of an amputated arm with signals very similar to the natural ones, succeeding in "imitating the colors" of the evoked sensations of the various types of receptors and related nerve fibers present in the fingertips of the hand. This has brought greater realism and greater functionality of the feelings experienced by patients.


    Source: Medical Xpress

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  • Seven exercises for shoulder arthritis

    Arthritis can affect any joint in the body, including the shoulder joints. Performing specific exercises on a regular basis can help relieve the symptoms of arthritis, which include pain and swelling.


    Source: Medical News Today

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  • Young Athletes With Shoulder Instability Might Benefit From Arthroscopy

    Young athletes with shoulder instability are considered to be a high-risk group of patients following arthroscopic shoulder stabilization given the high recurrence rates and lower rates of return to sport, which have been reported in the literature. However, according to researchers presenting their work today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting in San Diego outcomes may be improved by proper patient selection and reserving arthroscopic stabilization for athletes with fewer incidents of pre-operative instability.

    Source: Medical Xpress

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  • Elbow Injuries – and Surgery – Affect High School Pitchers More Than Anyone Else

    According to the study, athletes ages 15 to 19 accounted for 56.8 percent of ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction procedures - Tommy John surgery, as it is popularly known - from the start of 2011 through 2015.

    Source: The Inquirer

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  • Frozen Shoulder: Symptoms You Should Know

    Pain and stiffness can worsen over time until your shoulder feels frozen in one position. Here is how to get things moving again.

    Source: The Daily Star

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  • Researchers Determine the Rate of Return to Sport After Shoulder Surgery

    Athletes with shoulder instability injuries often undergo shoulder stabilization surgery to return to sport (RTS) and perform at their preinjury activity level. Returning to sports in a timely fashion and being able to perform at a high level are priorities for these athletes undergoing surgery.

    Source: Medical Xpress

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  • 2 Simple Shoulder Exercises Anyone Who Works Out Should Be Doing

    When it comes to workout routines, most people tend to focus on muscle groups that they can see or feel working immediately—legs, butt, abs, and arms. Smaller muscle groups, on the other hand, tend to be an afterthought (if they're even a thought at all).

    Source: SELF

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